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For press enquiries, please contact Daniel Meister, Communications Officer at the NYCI on 087 781 4903 or 01 425 5955 or email communications@nyci.ie

 

    • October 22, 2013 - 11:15am

    Proves welfare cut to young in budget unnecessary

    The National Youth Council of Ireland (NYCI), the umbrella body that represents youth organisations, has today (22.10.13) welcomed Government research that estimates at least 75% of people would have a higher income if working, stating that this contradicts the Government’s recent claims that young people were in a welfare trap.

     “We welcome this report as it disproves the Government’s earlier assertion that welfare payments for those under 25 years are a disincentive to work. In reality, where young people can secure a job there are strong financial incentives to do so,” stated James Doorley, NYCI deputy director.

    “The issue is not that young people are unwilling to work, or slow to take up places in education and training; the problem is that there are simply not enough job opportunities or training places available,” continued Mr Doorley.

    Prior to the recent budget changes a young person aged 23-24 years was in receipt of €144 per week and those aged 25 in receipt of €188. New proposals would reduce this to €100 and €144 per week respectively.

    “The majority of young jobseekers do not claim secondary benefits so this is the maximum payment they receive. Even if they were to take up a job on minimum wage rates they would have a weekly take home pay (minus USC) of €329. So there is a clear financial incentive for young jobseekers to take up employment: even when paid minimum wage rates compared to existing welfare payments as 23-24 year olds would receive an additional €185 per week and those aged 25 an extra €141 per week.”

     

    Not enough opportunities

     “We estimate that these proposed cuts will impact on at least 20,853* young jobseekers in 2014 based on those already on the live register, not taking into account the new claimants aged 22-25 years from January 2014. From our analysis of the Budget measures, Government is providing an additional 3,250 places on Tús, Momentum and JobBridge as it is not possible to say how many places will be created on JobPlus.

    “Therefore 20,853 young people are being “incentivised” into a guaranteed extra 3,250 places. We support activation into quality and meaningful education, training and work experience opportunities - but young people cannot access places that do not exist.”

     

    Youth Guarantee – much more needed

     

    “The allocation of an initial €14 million for the Youth Guarantee in Budget 2014 is welcome; however it represents 5% of the estimated annual cost of a comprehensive youth guarantee scheme. While exact estimates on the cost of implementation of the youth guarantee in Ireland are difficult, NYCI estimated in early 2013 that full implementation would cost in the region of €273million** per annum based on the number of young people unemployed for six months or more,” concluded Mr Doorley.

     

    ENDS

    CONTACT: Daniel Meister, NYCI Communications Manager: 087 781 4903, 01-478 4122 or communications@nyci.ie

    Notes to the editor

    1. NYCI BUDGET 2014 - FACTSHEET: Cuts to Jobseekers Allowance for those under 26 years

    online here (pdf):
     

    http://www.youth.ie/sites/youth.ie/files/Factsheet%20on%20cuts%20to%20under%2026s%20jobseekers.pdf

     

    2. About National Youth Council of Ireland
    NYCI is a membership-led umbrella organisation that represents and supports the interests of voluntary youth organisations working with over 380,000 young people, and uses its collective experience to act on issues that impact on young people.
    www.youth.ie

     

    3. Sources:
    *Dáil Question 321 September 24th 2013

    ** NYCI Youth Guarantee Factsheet http://www.youth.ie/sites/youth.ie/files/NYCI_051_A4_accessible.pdf

     

    • October 15, 2013 - 4:30pm

    Youth Council reaction to Budget 2014

    • Cuts to payments to young jobseekers disproportionate and unfair  
    • Cuts to youth services less than expected , but disappointing nonetheless
    • Youth Guarantee: 14 million a start, much more investment needed

    The National Youth Council of Ireland (NYCI), an umbrella organisation that represents voluntary youth organisations is extremely disappointed that Government has imposed swingeing cuts in social welfare payments to young unemployed people and expressed disappointment at the further reduction in funding for youth services. 

     

    Social welfare payment cuts

    The organisation stated that the proposed cuts were disproportionate and placed a further burden on those already suffering at the hands of a recession they had no role in creating.

    “Young people are seen as a soft target, and these proposals threaten to hit hard those most in need of support. Social welfare payments to young people under 21 are already disproportionately lower at €100 per week. These proposals would extend this lower rate to those aged 24, and also reduce payments to those under 26,” said Mary Cunningham, NYCI director.

    “We agree with Minister Howlin that ‘young people should be in education and training’ however due to cuts and lack of investment there are not sufficient education and training places to meet the needs of young jobseekers. Young people can’t take up training and education opportunities if they don’t exist.”

    Youth Guarantee

    “We do welcome the initial investment of €14m in the Youth Guarantee, we expect this is a start as this is far below what is required. We also welcome news that young jobseekers under 25 will qualify for Jobplus after 6 months unemployed rather than 12 months and that an additional 2,000 places are ringfenced for young people on Momentum,” continued Ms Cunningham.

     

    Funding for youth services

    “It is to be welcomed that the reduction in funding for youth work services will be €1 million lower than set out in the Comprehensive Review of Expenditure. However, the €2 million cut will hit youth organisations very hard as they continue working on the ground to support young people from disadvantaged areas and those suffering most at the hands of this recession,” concluded Ms Cunningham.

     

     

    ENDS

     

    CONTACT: Daniel Meister, NYCI Communications Manager: 087 781 4903, 01-478 4122 or communications@nyci.ie

     

     

    CONTACT: Daniel Meister, NYCI Communications Manager: 087 781 4903, 01-478 4122 or communications@nyci.ie

    Notes to the editor

    1. NYCI Pre-Budget Submission available online here (pdf):
    http://www.youth.ie/nyci/NYCI-Pre-Budget-Submission-2014-Beyond-Austerity

     

    2. About National Youth Council of Ireland
    NYCI is a membership-led umbrella organisation that represents and supports the interests of voluntary youth organisations working with over 380,000 young people, and uses its collective experience to act on issues that impact on young people.
    www.youth.ie

     

    3. Sources:
    *Assessment of the Economic Value of Youth Work by Indecon Economic Consultants, November 2012

    • October 14, 2013 - 10:30am

    Young people hardest hit by recession

    The National Youth Council of Ireland (NYCI), an umbrella organisation that represents voluntary youth organisations, has appealed to Government to step back from proposed swingeing cuts in social welfare payments to young unemployed people. 

    The organisation stated that the proposed cuts were disproportionate and placed a further burden on those already suffering at the hands of a recession they had no role in creating.

    “Young people are seen as a soft target, and these proposals threaten to hit hard those most in need of support. Social welfare payments to young people under 21 are already disproportionately lower at €100 per week. These proposals would extend this lower rate to those aged 24, and also reduce payments to those under 26,” said Mary Cunningham, NYCI director.

     

    Hardest hit by recession
    “The suggestion that young people are caught in a ‘welfare trap’ where work is unattractive is belied by the reality that young people have in fact been hardest hit by this recession. Over 177,000 young people have emigrated since 2008 and youth unemployment today is at almost 29% compared to just over 13% in 2008. Ireland also has the 4th highest rate of young people ‘not in education, employment or training’ in the EU.”* continued Ms Cunningham.

     

    “We need to work to provide more opportunities for these young people, not cut their supports. We are urging the Government to reconsider these proposed cuts in social welfare payments to young unemployed people,” concluded Ms Cunningham.

     

    ENDS

    CONTACT: Daniel Meister, NYCI Communications Manager: 087 781 4903, 01-478 4122 or communications@nyci.ie

    Notes to the editor

    1. NYCI Pre-Budget Submission available online here (pdf):
    http://www.youth.ie/nyci/NYCI-Pre-Budget-Submission-2014-Beyond-Austerity

     

    2. About National Youth Council of Ireland
    NYCI is a membership-led umbrella organisation that represents and supports the interests of voluntary youth organisations working with over 380,000 young people, and uses its collective experience to act on issues that impact on young people.
    www.youth.ie

     

    3. Sources:
    *Assessment of the Economic Value of Youth Work by Indecon Economic Consultants, November 2012

    • October 9, 2013 - 10:45am

    Youth services cut 6 times more than overall Government expenditure

    The National Youth Council of Ireland (NYCI), an umbrella organisation that represents voluntary youth organisations, is appealing to the Government to protect services for young people, particularly those hardest hit by recession.

     

    The organisation stated that funding for youth work services that support over 380,000 young people has already been cut by 30% from €73.1m in 2008 to €51.4m in 2013: “A further €3 million cut is proposed for 2014. We are calling on the Department of Children and Youth Affairs to reverse this proposal,” said Mary Cunningham, NYCI director.

     

    “Young people have been hardest hit by this recession. Over 177,000 young people have emigrated since 2008 and youth unemployment today is at almost 29% compared to just over 13% in 2008. These proposed cuts mean youth organisations would have to further reduce services and supports available to young people from disadvantaged areas and those suffering most at the hands of this recession, at a time when demand has increased.”

     

    Value for money

    Ms Cunningham also said that youth work services provide value for money: “Youth work services are not staff-cost heavy, as they are run by just under 1,400 full time staff working with over 40,000 volunteers. Moreover, an Indecon Report found that every €1 invested in youth work saves the State €2.20 in the long run.”*

    “We accept that all areas of public funding have faced cuts, but youth services have been cut by 6 times more than current Government expenditure since 2008. Given that the adjustment in 2014 will now be €600 million less than originally committed to by Government and in light of the severe cuts to date, we are calling on the Government to cancel the €3 million cuts to youth work,”** concluded Ms Cunningham.

     

    ENDS

    CONTACT: Daniel Meister, NYCI Communications Manager: 087 781 4903, 01-478 4122 or communications@nyci.ie

    Notes to the editor

    1. NYCI Pre-Budget Submission available online here (pdf):
    http://www.youth.ie/nyci/NYCI-Pre-Budget-Submission-2014-Beyond-Austerity

     

    2. About National Youth Council of Ireland
    NYCI is a membership-led umbrella organisation that represents and supports the interests of voluntary youth organisations working with over 380,000 young people, and uses its collective experience to act on issues that impact on young people.
    www.youth.ie

     

    3. Sources:
    *Assessment of the Economic Value of Youth Work by Indecon Economic Consultants, November 2012

    **Funding for youth work has been cut by 30% compared to current Government expenditure which has been cut by 4.3% (from €53.4bn to €51.1bn) since 2008.   

    4. Key facts & figures

    • Youth work services engage with and support 383,000 young people, majority in disadvantaged areas. Funding has been cut by 30% from €73.1m in 2008 to €51.4m in 2013.
    • 383,000 young people participate in and benefit from youth work, 53% coming from socially and economically disadvantaged areas.
    • Ireland has 4th highest number of young people not “in education, employment or training” (NEETS) in 2011, 18.4% here compared to average of 12.9%.
    • We accept that all areas of public funding have faced cuts but youth services have been cut by 6 times more than current Government expenditure since 2008. 

     

    • Funding for youth work has been cut by 30% compared to current Government expenditure which has been cut by 4.3% (from €53.4bn to €51.1bn) since 2008.   

     

    • Youth organisations have had to reduce services and supports available to young people at a time when demand has increased. Youth organisations want to support the youth guarantee, but if funding cut further limit their capacity to contribute.  

     

    • Another €3m cut will put services currently under severe strain. Last year angered by successive cuts young people, youth workers and youth organisations did protest outside Leinster House and DCYA.

     

    `           Recommendation  

     

    • The adjustment in 2014 will now be closer to €2.5 billion; therefore given the severe cuts to date we are calling on the Government to cancel the €3m cuts to youthwork. 
    • October 3, 2013 - 10:45am

    Over 450,000 young people could make crucial difference in referendum

     

    The National Youth Council of Ireland (NYCI) is urging young people to cast their vote in referendums on the Seanad and on a new Court of Appeal tomorrow.

     

    “There are over 450,000 young people aged 18 to 25 in the Republic of Ireland according to the latest census figures, and they could make a real difference in the outcome of the referendums,” stated James Doorley, deputy director of the NYCI.

     

    “As the representative body of national voluntary youth organisations working with almost 400,000 young people all over the country, NYCI believes the participation of young people in decision making is a fundamental right,” continued Mr Doorley.

     

    “Low levels of voter participation are not just a concern in their own right but also because they strike at the very foundations of active citizenship. A healthy democracy relies on citizens who are well informed, interested and engaged: so we would strongly encourage all young people to take this opportunity to make their voices heard,” concluded Mr Doorley.
     

    ENDS

     

    For further information, please contact Daniel Meister, Communications Manager at NYCI on 087 781 4903 or 01 425 5955 or email communications@nyci.ie

     

    Notes to Editors:

    * 460,760 young people aged 18 to 25 in the Republic of Ireland.
    Source: CSO Census 2011: CD212: Enumerated Population by Single Year of Age, Sex, Marital Status and Census Year

    National Youth Council of Ireland

    The National Youth Council of Ireland is a membership-led umbrella organisation that represents and supports the interests of voluntary youth organisations and uses its collective experience to act on issues that impact on young people.

     

    • September 12, 2013 - 2:00pm

    Youth Council pre-budget submission warns against further cuts to youth services

    • 177,000 young people have emigrated since 2008
    • youth unemployment 28.6% now (13.3% in 2008)
    • youth services cut by 30% since 2008
    • €1 invested in youth work saves State €2.20 in the long run

    The National Youth Council of Ireland (NYCI), an umbrella organisation that represents voluntary youth organisations, presented its pre-budget submission to the Oireachtas Committee on Finance, today (12.09.13).

    Speaking to the committee NYCI deputy director, James Doorley said that last May the National Economic and Social Council which advises Government stated that “young people have been hit hardest by the recession.” He highlighted the impact on young people of emigration, unemployment and cuts to youth work services: “Over 177,000 young people have emigrated since 2008; youth unemployment today is at 28.6% compared to 13.3% in 2008; and youth services working with those that need support most have been cut by 30% over the same period.”

    He added: “The figures make it clear there is a pressing need for Government to move beyond austerity and to develop a medium term strategy to invest in measures to support youth employment and youth work services, and to stem emigration. Youth work services are well placed to support the most vulnerable young people through the recession, but not if they are starved of funding and resources.”

    Youth work services are active in every community in Ireland and reach almost 383,000 young people, in particular young people from the most disadvantaged communities in Ireland. A recent Indecon Report found that for every €1 invested in youth work the economic benefit to the State in the long run is €2.20.

    According to the NYCI, youth services have taken a disproportionate cut since the onset of the crisis. The Comprehensive Review of Expenditure targets youth services for another €3 million cut in 2014. The NYCI has said that this is unacceptable and will be opposed by the NYCI and the youth sector as a whole.

    “The sector cannot take any further cuts. In the 2013 Budget the cut to youth services represented 33% of the total Department of Children and Youth Affairs budget cuts, despite the fact that the youth services budget only represents 14% of the Department’s overall budget.

     

    “If the services in the non-formal education sector are undermined or diminished through more cutbacks, we are likely to further marginalise young people who are already removed from education and the labour market,” concluded Mr Doorley.

     

    The National Youth Council of Ireland’s pre-budget submission highlights what it sees as the priorities for Government action and spending in the areas of:

    1. Defending Youth Work Services
    2. Providing supports for the most disadvantaged young jobseekers
    3. Reducing Child Poverty
    4. Tackling Alcohol Related Harm
    5. Emigration

    ENDS

    CONTACT: Daniel Meister, NYCI Communications Manager: 087 781 4903, 01-478 4122 or communications@nyci.ie

    Notes to the editor

    1. Pre-Budget Submission available online here (pdf):
    http://www.youth.ie/nyci/NYCI-Pre-Budget-Submission-2014-Beyond-Austerity

     

    2. About National Youth Council of Ireland

    NYCI is a membership-led umbrella organisation that represents and supports the interests of voluntary youth organisations working with over 380,000 young people, and uses its collective experience to act on issues that impact on young people.
    www.youth.ie

     

    3. Summary of Recommendations

    In this submission, NYCI outlines what we believe to be priorities for Government action and spending:

     

    1. Defending Youth Work Services
    • Proposed Government cuts to youth work services of €3m in 2014 to be cancelled.     

     

    2.     Provide supports for most disadvantaged young jobseekers

    • Develop a strand within the Youth Guarantee scheme to support young people with limited qualifications who are long term unemployed. 

     

    3.    Reducing Child Poverty

    • No further cuts to Child Benefit for those currently in receipt of social welfare payments.
    • Provide enhanced services for children that will make a meaningful impact on the costs of raising children and will help to achieve better child welfare outcomes.

     

    4.    Tackling Alcohol Related Harm

    • Introduce a 1% social responsibility levy on drinks manufacturers to generate €25m to replace the sponsorship of large sporting and cultural events by the drinks industry and to support  initiatives by the youth sector to reduce alcohol related harm among young people.

     

    5.   Emigration

    • Allocate an additional €1 million to provide pre-departure supports for prospective emigrants.

     

    4. * Sources:

     

     

     

     

    • An Indecon Report found that for every €1 invested in youth work the economic benefit/costs saved by the State in the long run are €2.20.

    Assessment of the Economic Value of Youth Work by Indecon Economic Consultants, November 2012  http://www.youth.ie/economic_value

     

    • September 10, 2013 - 12:00pm

    • 50,000 18 year olds eligible to vote for first time
    • Registration deadline: Tuesday, September 17th

    The National Youth Council of Ireland (NYCI) is reminding young people to register to vote ahead of next month’s referendums on the Seanad and on new Court of Appeal.

    “With just days left to register to vote, we would urge any young person who is 18 years of age on or before October 4th to apply for inclusion on the supplementary register. They can do so up until Tuesday, September 17th,” said James Doorley, NYCI deputy director.

    The NYCI also highlighted the importance of fist-time voters making sure they are registered, as an estimated 50,000 young people are turning 18 in 2013.* Mr Doorley explained:
    “Not being on the register is a key reason why young people don’t vote, with many not even aware they have to register. In fact, a previous NYCI study found that 26% of 18-25 year olds were not registered to vote, rising to 36% among 18-21 year olds.”**

    “Also, a number of young people who have moved away from where they are registered to vote because they are in education or employment elsewhere and are unable to travel back to vote can change their voting registration to their current residence, again on or before September 17th,” continued Mr Doorley.

    “We strongly encourage young people to register and to go out and vote in the upcoming referendums. It is your democratic right and a great opportunity to have your say in how we shape the future of this country. Those seeking information on the proposed constitutional changes should check the Referendum Commission website at www.referendum2013.ie ” concluded Mr Doorley.

    Young people seeking to register, can obtain the relevant form (RFA2) from local authorities or can download it from www.checktheregister.ie . Those wishing to change their registration address can download the RFA3 form. These forms must be completed and brought to a local Garda station to be witnessed and stamped, and I.D. will be required.

    ENDS

     

    For further information, please contact Daniel Meister, Communications Manager at NYCI on 01 425 5955 or 087 781 4903 or email communications@nyci.ie

     

    Notes to Editors:

    Who can vote in the referendum?
    Every citizen of Ireland ordinarily resident in the State, who is aged 18 years or over on polling day, and whose name is entered on the register of electors is entitled to vote. 

    * CSO Census 2011: Number of those age 16 years in 2011: 56,005

    (CD212: Enumerated Population by Single Year of Age, Sex, Marital Status and Census Year )  

    **The Truth About Youth (NYCI)

     NYCI study http://www.voteat16.ie/files/uploads/on_Voter_Participation_National_Survey_FINAL.pdf

    National Youth Council of Ireland

    The National Youth Council of Ireland is a membership-led umbrella organisation that represents and supports the interests of voluntary youth organisations and uses its collective experience to act on issues that impact on young people.

     

     

    • August 29, 2013 - 12:15pm

    Youth Council reaction to CSO migration figures
    • almost 35,000 young emigrants

    The National Youth Council of Ireland (NYCI) has today (29.08.13) called for more to be done to stem the tide of youth emigration and to support young Irish emigrants both before they leave and in preparation for when they return.

    Reacting to CSO Population and Migration Estimates* released today Marie-Claire McAleer, NYCI senior research and policy officer said that the high level of young people under 25 emigrating was disappointing but not unexpected. The numbers of young people aged 15-24 emigrating in the year to April 2013 was an estimated 34,800. Over the same period overall numbers emigrating increased to 89,000 - the highest level since the start of the crisis in 2008. A significant increase in the numbers aged 25-44 emigrating to 41,000 was also recorded.

    Figures also indicate:
    • 24.6 per cent (21,900) of emigrants went to the UK while 17.3 per cent (15,400) went to Australia
    • an estimated 177,000 young people aged 15-24 have emigrated since 2008

    “The emigration figures released today further underline the need for immediate and stronger Government action to stem the flow of young people leaving the country in the first instance and, secondly, the need to provide greater support and advice to young people who are left with little option but to emigrate,” said Ms McAleer.

    “These figures re-affirm the need for the recommendations from ‘Time to Go?’ the NYCI report on youth emigration published earlier this year, to be implemented,” continued Ms McAleer.

    Recommendations as a result of this report include:
    • Give an existing Minister responsibility for emigration policy and for responding to and connecting with the Irish abroad.
    • Government should develop and implement a strategy for emigrants.
    • Fund an existing agency that operates in the Republic of Ireland to provide assistance to prospective emigrants intending to emigrate.
    • Ensure centralised data collection on emigrants to inform the development of a policy response.
    • Launch a campaign to promote foreign languages at second level and third level education.
    • Department of Social Protection, and Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade to collaborate in the creation and maintenance of a portal site which would function to map and direct the user to existing websites providing information at a local level.
    • Promotion of Internships, Work Placements or Employment Opportunities Abroad.

    The NYCI report on youth emigration ‘Time to Go?’ is available here: http://www.youth.ie/youth_emigration

    ENDS
    Contact: Daniel Meister, Communications Manager at NYCI: 087 781 4903, 01-478 4122 or communications@nyci.ie

    Notes to Editors:
    National Youth Council of Ireland
    The National Youth Council of Ireland is a membership-led umbrella organisation that represents and supports the interests of 54 voluntary youth organisations working with 380,000 young people, and uses its collective experience to act on issues that impact on young people.

    *CSO Population and Migration Estimates April 2013:
    http://www.cso.ie/en/releasesandpublications/er/pme/populationandmigrati...

    NYCI Youth Emigration Report ‘Time to Go?’ (2013)
    Full report ‘Time to Go?’ available here (PDF): http://www.youth.ie/youth_emigration

    RECOMMENDATIONS ARISING FROM NYCI YOUTH EMIGRATION REPORT ‘TIME TO GO?’

    Based on and informed by the research and consultations with young emigrants, NYCI proposes 7 recommendations it considers important to implement in order to adequately and appropriately meet the needs of young Irish emigrants.

    The recommendations are categorised under the headings:
    • Policy recommendations for Government.
    • Practical support measures to respond to the needs of prospective emigrants and/or new emigrants,

    These recommendations, if fully implemented, would help to support many young Irish emigrants who are considering emigrating or who have already emigrated to be as prepared as they can be for the challenges they may encounter as emigrants.

    Policy Recommendations for Government

    Recommendations

    1. Appoint a Minister with responsibility for emigration policy and for responding to and connecting with the Irish abroad.

    The research highlights the need for Government to ensure that greater connections are made and sustained with young Irish people who are leaving the country at the present time. There are a number of tangible ways of doing this which Government need to consider. Emigrants suggested one way of responding to the needs of the Irish abroad was by appointing a Ministry or Government Department to respond to and connect with the Irish abroad.

    This Ministry would have responsibility for the development of a long-term strategy to attract emigrants back to Ireland when the economy recovers and for policy planning to respond to the needs of returning emigrants in the future. The department would have specific responsibility for ensuring long-term planning in the development of public policies, responding to the needs of Irish emigrants, and liaising with key public employment services to facilitate return migration to fill gaps in the Irish labour market as they arise in the future.

    2. Develop and adopt a strategic approach to meet the needs of young Irish emigrants.

    Government needs to develop and implement a strategy for emigrants. The strategy requires an action plan, and the necessary supports to take account of the diversity of needs and provide structural supports at home to provide information and assistance to young people who are emigrating. The strategy and action plan needs to include ways of incentivising Irish emigrants to return to Ireland when the economy recovers.

    It is vital that Government invests in a strategy to attract emigrants back to Ireland in the medium to long term to fill gaps in the Irish labour market. Government must also plan for returning emigrants in terms of the future provision of social services and facilities.

    3. Fund an existing agency that operates in the Republic of Ireland to provide assistance to prospective emigrants intending to emigrate.

    As profiled in the report the existence of a centralised one stop shop to support emigrants (in the form of I/CAN) was found by emigrants in Canada to be of tremendous value. Many felt that such a resource would have benefited them greatly had it been available in Ireland prior to their departure.

    NYCI calls on Government to fund an existing agency in Ireland to provide assistance to prospective emigrants. The agency would offer advice and support services for Irish people intending to emigrate. It would function to assist emigrants by providing them with information on everything from accommodation to health care, insurance, and visa advice. It is envisaged it would help potential emigrants to link into agencies and networks in the country they are emigrating to. The agency would also provide help and support to emigrants to prepare for and resolve any potential problems they may encounter in their host country in advance of their departure from Ireland.

    4. Centralised Data Collection on Emigrants

    To date there has been an absence of reliable data on who is emigrating and where they are emigrating to. Such data collection and profiling is integral to future policy planning and the maintenance of good links with our citizen’s aboard.

    The UCC study ‘emigre’ promises to generate data on the profile of contemporary emigrants including their age, educational qualifications, profession, emigration destination, and intention to return to Ireland. As NYCI’s research reveals such data is essential to inform the development of policy to respond to the issue of emigration.

    NYCI recommends Government uses the ‘emigre' data to inform the development of a policy response to emigration, and supports the continuous collection of data to profile and track emigrants from Ireland.

    5. Launch a campaign to promote foreign languages at second level and third level education.

    Launch a campaign to promote foreign languages at second level and third level education to enhance the skill set of Irish people and equip them with the linguistic skills to compete nationally and internationally. Such skills would make Irish employees more attractive to employers from non-English countries.

    Practical support measures to respond to the needs of Prospective Emigrants and/or New Emigrants

    6. Department of Social Protection, and Department of Foreign affairs & Trade to collaborate in the creation and maintenance of a portal site which would function to map and direct the user to existing websites providing information at a local level.

    The research identified the need to provide more information via the World Wide Web to support and facilitate young people to access essential information on internships or work opportunities abroad.

    Given there are already many websites and social media pages which provide very good information on employment opportunities, advice and tips on interview technique, and contact details for support organisations abroad, NYCI believes there is a need to assist young emigrants to access these sites via a website portal. The portal would ensure the user could easily navigate through the website portal to access the information on their intended destination.

    In the event that there is inadequate information available for a country, the Department of Social Protection, and Department of Foreign affairs & Trade should address the information deficit by supporting the creation and maintenance of a website for that country.

    7. Promotion of Internships, Work Placements or Employment Opportunities Abroad.

    The research highlighted that many young emigrants were not aware of existing opportunities in relation to internships, work placements or employment opportunities abroad. Many felt that there was limited promotion of such initiatives in Ireland and suggested that prospective emigrants would benefit from such knowledge prior to their departure from Ireland.

    The Department of Social Protection currently advertises opportunities of this nature available in Ireland. NYCI recommends that they extend such advertisements to include the promotion of internships, work placements and employment opportunities abroad through the use of national newspapers, universities or institutes of technology or through other forms of social media targeted at young people. An example of a good way of disseminating such information to young people is through the development of an application containing relevant information on opportunities abroad that could be downloaded for free.

    • July 10, 2013 - 11:00am

    The National Youth Council of Ireland (NYCI) has welcomed the Government’s confirmation that a recommendation to lower the voting age from 18 to 16 will be put to referendum within the lifetime of this administration.

    Reacting to yesterday evening’s (09.07.13) Government announcement, Mary Cunningham, NYCI director said: “NYCI has been campaigning on this issue since 2009, and we are delighted at this announcement. The young people in the NYCI Vote at 16 campaign group pressed for a lower voting age at the Constitutional Convention last January. It is heartening to see that their arguments have been taken on board and the issue will now be put to the people who will have an opportunity to debate its merits.”

    Maria Kelly, Vote at 16 campaign member stated: “If a 16 year old can leave school, seek full-time employment and pay tax, why can we not vote and have a say in issues that affect us?”

    “It is worth remembering that while many believe that the voting age has always been 18, this is not the case. The voting age is not static, but something that changes as our societies develop and mature,” added Ms Kelly.

    “It has been successful in enlarging democracy in Austria and elsewhere, so why not here in Ireland? It is only a matter of time before the idea that suffrage wasn’t extended to 16 and 17 year olds will be as antiquated and laughable as the idea that women shouldn’t vote,” concluded Ms Kelly.

    ENDS

    Contact: Daniel Meister, Communications Manager at NYCI: 087 781 4903, 01-478 4122 or communications@nyci.ie

    Notes to Editors:

    National Youth Council of Ireland
    The National Youth Council of Ireland is a membership-led umbrella organisation that represents and supports the interests of Irish voluntary youth organisations and uses its collective experience to act on issues that impact on young people. www.youth.ie

    Vote@16 Youtube clip:
    See the young people explain some of the reasons for reducing the voting age to 16 in this animated youtube clip:
    http://youtu.be/HoCD4a9ZM5o

    NYCI submission to Constitutional Convention here:
    https://www.constitution.ie/SubmissionDetails.aspx?sid=48e63276-bd5d-e211-a5a0-005056a32ee4

    Vote@16 Campaign website:
    For further information on Vote@16 campaign see http://www.voteat16.ie/

    What is the Constitutional Convention?

    The Convention is a forum comprising of 100 people, representative of Irish society and parliamentarians from the island of Ireland, with an independent chairman.

    The Convention has been established by Resolutions of the Houses of the Oireachtas. It has been asked to consider and make recommendations to the Oireachtas on a range of topics as possible future amendments to the Constitution.

    Government has undertaken to respond to the Convention’s recommendations within four months
     

     

     

    • July 3, 2013 - 8:30am

    Young people show TDs why arts necessary even in times of recession

    Young people from around Ireland will be taking the opportunity to speak directly to politicians about their experiences of participating in the arts at the National Youth Council of Ireland (NYCI) Youth Arts Showcase 2013 taking place today (03.07.13) in the National Library, Dublin.

    Officially opened this year by Minister for Arts, Heritage and Gaeltacht, Jimmy Deenihan T.D., the annual event aims to showcase the exceptional quality of youth arts activity happening throughout Ireland and celebrate the contribution of youth arts to the lives of young people and to Irish society.

    “The National Youth Arts Showcase allows us to share and celebrate a small proportion of the massive contribution young people make to our rich cultural heritage,” said Anne O’Gorman, of the NYCI Youth Arts Programme speaking at the event.
     

    “The showcase also highlights that access to the arts for young people is a right, not a privilege. Our reputation as a nation of artists, writers, actors and musicians is disproportionate to our small size, and disproportionate to public funding investment. We want to ensure that the promotion of Ireland as a culturally rich society is a lived reality for all our young people,” continued Ms O’Gorman.

     

    “Youth arts is where the next generation of artists find their voice, upon whom we depend to maintain our status as a leading nation for artistic and cultural endeavour, which makes a significant contribution to the cultural, social and economic well being of the country,” concluded Ms O’Gorman. 

    ENDS

     

    Contact Daniel Meister, Communications Manager at NYCI on 087 781 4903, 01-478 4122 or e-mail communications@nyci.ie

     

    Notes to Editors:

     

    Performers include young people from:

    • County Wexford Youth Theatre - 'That Night Follows Day' explores  how children's lives are affected by the adult world which surrounds them
    • Kerry Youth Dance – performing ‘Forsaken’
    • CDS Pictures (Winners of Fresh Film Festival 2012) – ‘A Christmas Plan’
    • Errigal Groove Orchestra, Donegal - impressive collective breathes fresh life into old jazz standards
    • Young Irish Filmmakers – will be filming on the day

    When: Wednesday July 3rd 2013 at 12:00 midday

    Where: Seminar Room, National Library of Ireland, Kildare St, Dublin 2
    Officially opened by: Jimmy Deenihan T.D., Minister for Arts, Heritage and Gaeltacht

    Young performers (age 14 – 18) available to speak about benefits to them of participating in the arts.

    Youth Arts factsheet (includes infographics & stats):
    http://www.youth.ie/sites/youth.ie/files/youtharts_showcase_factsheet.pdf

     

    National Youth Council of Ireland

    NYCI is a membership-led umbrella organisation that represents and supports the interests voluntary youth organisations and uses its collective experience to act on issues that impact on young people.
    www.youth.ie

     

    The National Youth Council of Ireland Arts Programme is a partnership approach to promoting and developing youth arts in Ireland. The Programme receives funding from the Arts Council, and the Department of Children and Youth Affairs.
    www.youtharts.ie